Human rights institution gains ‘A’ status

The Norwegian National Human Rights Institution has been granted accreditation status ‘A’ by the board of the Global Alliance of National Human Rights Institutions (GANHRI).

Petter F. Wille, Director of the Norwegian National Human Rights Institution. Photo: Norwegian National Human Rights Institution.
Petter F. Wille, Director of the Norwegian National Human Rights Institution. Photo: Norwegian National Human Rights Institution.

‘A’ status is given to national human rights institutions that fully comply with the UN Paris Principles.

One result of the decision is that the Norwegian institution receives voting rights in the international and European network for national institutions as well as the right to meet and speak in a number of UN human rights meetings and processes.

‘I am pleased that Norway’s national institution for human rights has obtained this status so that it can keep up its important work of promoting and protecting human rights, including internationally,’ said Olemic Thommessen, President of the Storting.

Founding approved in 2014

The new status is consistent with what the Storting expected when it decided to establish a new national human rights institution in June 2014. Read a letter from the European Network of National Human Rights Institutions.

“Although the national institution’s main tasks are in Norway, international activity is a natural extension of our national work,” Petter F. Wille, director of the institution, wrote in a letter to the Storting’s presidency.

Organisationally, the institution reports to the Storting but is otherwise independent. The legislative act and instructions concerning the institution were adopted by the Storting in April 2015.

The national institution’s responsibilities

The national institution is intended to strengthen the implementation of human rights, in particular by:

  • monitoring and reporting on the human rights situation in Norway, including making recommendations to ensure that Norway’s human rights obligations are fulfilled,
  • advising the Storting, the Government, the Sami Parliament and other public bodies and private parties on the implementation of human rights,
  • disseminating human rights information, including guidance for individuals on national and international complaint mechanisms,
  • promoting training, education and research in the field of human rights,
  • facilitating cooperation with relevant public bodies and other parties engaged in human rights work,
  • participating in international cooperation to promote and protect human rights.

 The national institution shall not hear individual cases concerning human rights violations.

 Read more on the Act relating to the Norwegian National Human Rights Institution.

 Read more about the Norwegian National Human Rights Institution.


Last updated: 30.06.2017 15:46