Dictionary

Do you want to know what a petition resolution is or what is meant by duty of disclosure? Here is a list of explanations of terms that are frequently used in the Norwegian Parliament.

Velg bokstav

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  • pairing

    an informal arrangement whereby a Member of one party agrees with a Member of an opposing party not to attend a particular sitting or vote. This system ensures that the proportional relationship between the parties is maintained during a vote.
  • parliamentarianism (parliamentary rule)

    system of government whereby the Government is accountable to the national assembly (in Norway, the Storting). The Storting can force the government to resign through a vote of no confidence.
  • parliamentary leader

    chair of a party group in the Storting.
  • parliamentary press club

    the press organization in the Storting, the Storting’s press gallery.
  • parliamentary question

    question asked at Question Time. Oral questions are those questions that are asked at the first, oral part of Question Time. Ordinary questions are those that are submitted to the cabinet minister in advance, and which are answered during ordinary Question Time.
  • parliamentary term

    The Storting is elected for four years at a time. A parliamentary term is the four-year term of office of a Storting.
  • party group

    all the Members of the same political party belong to a party group in the Storting.
  • party manifesto

    summary of a political party’s standpoints on different issues; a presentation of the party’s policies.
  • petition resolution

    decision made in the Storting that begins as follows: "The Storting asks the Government... "
  • plenary Storting

    full assembly of the Storting for a sitting. Until 1 October 2009, the Storting divided into two chambers, the Odelsting and the Lagting, when dealing with legislation. Now, all business is dealt with by the Storting in plenary session.
  • preparatory Council of State

    informal meeting of the Government to clarify the matters that will be submitted to the King in Council.
  • prerogative

    (from the Latin: the one who asks first) exclusive rights of an individual, usually used to refer to the Royal Prerogative. The word was formerly used to refer to the privileges that only the King had. In keeping with the reduction in personal royal power in Norway over the last two centuries, the word now has limited significance, and is most commonly used to describe something that only the Government (King in Council) has the authority to decide, not the Storting. An example of this is administration of the Church.
  • Presidium

    when the Storting constitutes itself, it elects a President and five Vice Presidents. These six individuals collectively constitute the Storting’s Presidium. The Presidium is responsible for planning and administering the business of the Storting in accordance with the premises of the Constitution and the Storting’s Rules of Procedure. The President of the Storting holds the highest public position in Norway after the King.
  • Private Member’s Bill

    Bill submitted by a Member of the Storting. All Members may prepare Private Member’s Bills to be considered by the Storting. The Norwegian abbreviation used for such Bills is representantforslag L.
  • Private Member’s Motion

    Motion for decision submitted by a Member of the Storting. All Members may prepare Private Member’s Motions to be considered by the Storting. The Norwegian abbreviation used for such motions is representantforslag S.
  • proceedings on the Fiscal Budget

    work on the Fiscal Budget. This is the Storting’s most important responsibility besides legislation and scrutiny of the Government and public administration.
  • proportional representation

    the electoral system whereby mandates (seats) are divided between the parties (electoral lists) in relation to the proportion of the total vote they receive. This system has been used in Norway since 1920.
  • proposed amendment to the Constitution

    Article 112 of the Constitution determines that proposed amendments to the Constitution must be submitted during the first three yours of a parliamentary term, and must be dealt with during the first, second or third year of the following term. Consequently, there will always be a general election between the proposed amendment and the decision. By doing this, the electorate is given the opportunity to express its view.
  • Proposition to the Odelsting (historical term)

    legislative Bill sent by the Government to the Odelsting for consideration. The system of the Odelsting and Lagting was abolished as of 1 October 2009. Propositions to the Odelsting have now been replaced by Propositions to the Storting (Bill).
  • Proposition to the Storting (Bill and Resolution)

    proposal from the Government for the Enactment of a Bill, on ordinary matters and issues relating to the budget (Resolutions to the Storting), which the Storting must make a decision on. Abbreviated in Norwegian to prop. LS.
  • Proposition to the Storting (Bill)

    legislative bill sent by the Government to the Storting for consideration. Until 1 October 2009, the term used was Proposition to the Odelsting. Then, the Storting divided into two chambers, the Odelsting and the Lagting, when dealing with legislation. Now, all business is dealt with by the Storting in plenary session. Abbreviated in Norwegian to prop. L.
  • Proposition to the Storting (historical term)

    proposal from the Government on a matter that the Storting must make a decision on. Propositions always contain a preworded document for the Storting to vote on. As of 1 October 2009, the new term for this is Proposition to the Storting (Resolution).
  • Proposition to the Storting (Resolution)

    proposal from the Government for a resolution on ordinary matters and issues relating to the budget (Resolution of the Storting), which the Storting must make a decision on. Abbreviated in Norwegian to prop. S.
  • public opinion

    the prevailing view that ordinary people have about a particular subject.